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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 18
WMPT (PBS) 2
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
a living. this is what has become of the ancient city. he has lost his home and his job, so every day he sifts through filth and stench so he can feed his children. life is really bad. there is no work and money. that is why i come here to collect and rubbish. this revolution was supposedly about a better future and a better tomorrow, and many residents still cling to that hope, and they believe the ongoing fighting, not just in the city but also in the countryside, is worth the struggle. a petrol now comes from a barrel at the side of the road. three times the price it was before the revolution. people queued for hours in the cold for bread, now 10 times more expensive and in short supply. the bombardment has subsided, but the suffering has not, and the fighting has moved elsewhere. we joined the rebels on an operation, running across open ground to avoid sniper fire. now the fighters are laying siege to an infantry training school. the free syrian army controls most of the land here, and so the 300 government troops inside know they are surrounded. no reinforcements to come. the rebels
data from u.s. cities compared to other cities in canada and other places, they're not radically different. what is most distinctive is that our violent crime is far more lethal and that is largely due to the fact that we have a rather porous system from trying to keep guns from dangerous system. >> connecticut has some of the strictest gun control laws in america get as you suggest it is very easy for weapons to move across this country, in my experience come whenever one of these mass shootings happens, it does not lead necessarily to tighter gun control. >> sadly, that is the case. typically, when such incidents occur, you have different agitations of those events. you have one set of individuals who say that we have to do something to strengthen our gun laws. then you have another group of individuals who say that we made it easier for teachers to have guns in public schools or what i consider to be rather fantasy come rather bad ideas. there are too many people who have this notion that the way we are going to solve this problem is to simply have more citizens armed and read
killed and others wounded. the shootings followed similar incidents in pakistan's largest city of karachi, where four female health workers were shot dead. across the country, authorities have suspended the polio eradication drive for the time being. many who want their children vaccinated are disappointed. >> i want to get my son back, but there is no one here. >> we headed to a carracci neighborhood, where a health worker was shot dead on tuesday. this is a slum area often considered too dangerous for the police and paramilitary troops to penetrate. two workers were killed in the houses behind me. it is too dangerous to go there, but we have come to that area hoping to speak to the victims' families. the anti polio campaigners fromlive the short distance where they were killed. the family was devastated. gunmen shot at her family while they were visiting. she says may face resistance in their efforts. >> the women want their children to be vaccinated, but some are warned against it by their man, who says the program is a conspiracy to spoil future generations. the women say this is the
, the world's oldest city is another place that people visit. there is obviously east jerusalem and the old city. one of the things he was saying that he might push in the future is walking, hiking, that sort of thing, activity holidays. >> all right, from manger square, thank you very much indeed. we will just show you briefly these pictures from the midnight mass. in many parts of the world, the 24th, the night before christmas really is the most important holy day of the year, and we can take you now to the vatican. pope benedict is holding a midnight mass at st. peter's basilica in the vatican. it is not yet midnight in italy, but because of the pope's health and to give him time to rest before he delivers the christmas day message, this year, the ceremony began at 9:00 gmt, and that would be 10:00 in italy, which was just about one hour ago. the pope conducting this mess and also lighting the candle of peace, which he did earlier and put on the balcony of his apartment window, which overlooks st. peter's square. this is one of the largest churches anywhere in the world. there are touri
into gangs of killing and destruction. the army has destroyed cities and towns. it has committed massacres against our people, who took to the streets to demand freedom. long live syria, free and europe. >> he also defected from the bashar al-assad government. before that he held several high-ranking posts including the ambassador to sweden. i asked him how significant it is. >> it is very significant because one of the highest- ranking officers that have affected so far, and this man is the head of the military police and he must know a lot of things that have been going on by the army, invading the cities and killing civilians and bombarding the area with chemical weapons. he has said homs was bombed with chemical weapons. this is his statement. i think he was in a position to do this because you have all the reports coming to him. >> is it really that significant given that bashar al-assad still can count the military in multiples of tens of thousands? he is getting help from the russians, the iranians, and also has fallen out of lebanon. he looks pretty secure and appears to be acting
in the previous year. one man knows a lot about that subject, new york city's deputy police commissioner, paul brown, who joins us live right now. mr. brown, congratulations. how have you done it? >> thank you, mainly through 35,000 men and women in uniform, but particularly through something called operation at attack where we send as many uniformed police officers as possible into areas where we have seen spikes and violence, particularly shootings. >> that sounds almost like a back to basics campaign. why was the decision taken to go in that direction? >> well, it started with mayor bloomberg and commissioner kelly coming into the office right after 9/11 with a deep downturn in the economy, less tax revenue. we lost 6000 police officers through attrition, we have 6000 fewer now than we had then. that forced us to take a look at how we deploy officers into the city. instead of dividing them up as we usually did into 76 precincts, we focused better on defining exactly where the most violent crimes were happening and putting the biggest number of officers there, the biggest bang for the block.
will take a look. >> the center of mexico city is on lockdown. hours to go before he is officially sworn in as president, it has been put in place outside of parliamentary buildings for days. >> i know that the president -- >> the president-elect has been making friends north of the border. in washington, he assured president obama he was proposing a new security strategy to try to reduce the drug-related violence that marked his predecessor's time in office. far from the white house is the tourist resort. the only political experience before winning the presidency was his government here. it is one of the projects he is remembered fondly for in the town as well as building a new infrastructure. his friend and political allies have rejected the suggestion that the president is all style and no substance. >> he is a very straightforward man, very committed with an excellent vision of the country , an excellent statement, and he knows how to listen. dodge a municipality on the outskirts of mexico city where the tentacles of the drug violence have started to reach. it is a particular proble
. only a few roads are available. and going out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. a
is that the city center. armed rebels are in parts of the ring around damascus. this is one of them. the rebels to film to this, and any civilians who have not escaped, have been shelled in the last few days. they keep the rebels back from this strong. . bbc was invited in to visit the detention center run by air force intelligence. we were not allowed to see the cellblocks. human rights groups say torture happens here. they paraded six prisoners. they said they were not speaking underdressed. the governor said any doubters were making the wrong assumptions about syria's secular state. syrian state tv was in the room to film. none of the men had been in court. all have confessed to being in al qaeda-style groups. >> the main work is making explosive devices to plant. >> they produce the algerian passport of this person, who said he was also a french citizen. >> i decided to do something for the children of syria, for the families and the powerless. i decided to join the jihad rather than crying in front of my tv. >> he would not answer when i asked if he had been tortured. two said there were p
. the middle east editor is in damascus and sent this report on the battle for an increasingly divided city. >> damascus is at the heart of the bloodiest arab uprising. they keep them under tight security that squeezes traffic down the main road. the capitals still functions. but the battle for damascus is under way. it is happening in the suburbs after months of shelling and air strikes. it is controlled by the rebels the claim they own about one- third of greater damascus. the rebels only have pockets of ground. these were blocks of flats. all sides should distinguish between civilians hiding. almost every building is damaged, which suggests is being treated as a military target. >> they sought a bomb and a barrel of explosives dropped from the helicopter. the blitz is breaking the city and breaking lives. it isn't breaking with the president's enemies. >> they have shown that they have the stomach for a fight. they can endure pain and they have the conviction that if they don't, they will be killed. the question for them is what more they will have to do. the fighters showed off what the
. deserted. it feels like a road to nowhere. then we arrived in the middle of the jungle. a city is rising. this is going to be the new capital. this has to be one of the most extraordinary construction projects i have ever seen. i am on the roof of a foreign debt 50 room -- 450 room, 5 star theater that comes to the convention center and carved out of the jungle and 18 hold championship golf course. it is a spectacular vanity project in a country where most people live on barely $1 a day. equatorial, guinea is a dictatorship. his family has been accused of rampant corruption. has hadident's son assets worth 1 million euros seized by the french government. oil and gas are the keys to understanding the regime. editorial beginning -- equity torial guinea life expectancy barely topped 50. public dissent is a dangerous. anger is close to the surface. >> the people are suffering. all the oil money is taken by the president's family. no one can say anything. if you do the secret police would come to arrest you. >> the president gave me a rare interview. he is 70 but in no mood for retirement. >>
in violence in the country's major cities and that the conflict is becoming increasingly sectarian in nature. it warns that more and more foreigners are joining both sides in the fighting. now to the ongoing controversy surrounding the attack on the u.s. mission in libya. today, representatives from the state department appeared before u.s. lawmakers. officials acknowledged that some very painful lessons were learned from the benghazi assault in which america's ambassador and three others died could this comes in the same week that a scathing report faulted management failures at the state department. in response, the head of the diplomatic security bureau resigned. what are those painful lessons that you think that the state department has learned from the attack. >> some of the lessons they have learned in their high-risk missions, they need to have more security. that is not as mean more security guards come it means better and tougher buildings and more importantly they need to look at intelligence in a different way. they cannot expect to have a warning of an attack that will come, they
, trucks loaded with people's belongings make their way through the streets of the city. human rights organizations said that in the country as a whole, some 2.5 million people are not displaced. that is leaving aside all those who fled to neighboring countries. at this mass in damascus, the new syrian orthodox patriarch called for an end to the violence. >> we in antioch, he said, have got to inspire all parties in flaming the conflict to lay down their weapons they get nothing but destruction and devastation. for now, the conflict and deteriorating weather conditions inflict increasing misery on civilians. the prospect of peace through dialogue seems beyond reach. >> for more news around the world, there have been clashes in egypt was the second city of alexandria on the eve of the second stage of voting on the country's controversial constitution. islamists who backed the constitution were met by smaller groups of opposition protesters. police fired tear gas and cordoned off the area. italy's prime minister has resigned, meaning the country will go to the polls in february. mario m
fragments remains. it came down close to the city of shymkent. >> a plane has crash landed on a road in burma. two died and 11 were injured when the aircraft came down three kilometers short of its intended destination. here is our report. >> a burned-out shell now lying in a field. this was an aircraft flying an internal route popular with terrorists. the plane crashed into a rice field just before 9:00 a.m. local time. it was en route from the old capital to heho, which is the gateway place to the lake. one of the passengers told the bbc how they circled the airport before they tried to land. >> we went in those clouds, and suddenly we crashed. we just hit the ground, and then it was all red, and orange, and smoke came. then we saw some fire. then the steward he is opened the emergency exit. we thought it better to get out as soon as possible before it might explode. >> there had been 65 passengers and six crew on board. investigators are trying to determine the exact cause of the crash. some reports suggest an engine fire. the fatalities include a motor cyclist on the ground. the
-- and crash to the road below? and why had the tunnel past the city in best -- passed the safety inspection just months ago? >> they will quickly take measures to prevent similar accidents. >> that work began with a hammer and chisel. across japan, there are thought to be at least 49 tunnels of similar age and designed to the one that collapsed. it will take a lot of workers an awful long time to check every inch of every one like this. the question people are asking here is why wasn't it done before. bbc news, yoky -- tokyo. >> it is nearly 25 years since saddam hussein's forces killed thousands of iraqi kurds with chemical weapons. now the kurdistan regional government is trying to establish the attack as an internationally-recognized act of genocide. they are seeking help to dig up and identify the dead. we have one of the first journalist to report from the scene. he has returned to assess the continuing fallout. >> i would not have recognized the place. it is now busy and expanding fast. however bustling it may be, no one here forgets the gas attacks of march, 1988. saddam hussein's pl
, marginal towns. and then it came to the cities. we went back to this into account -- to a town, poor and neglected. we found a festering frustrations of young and old. they say nothing has changed. they did say, we got freedom of expression. we heard the same thing in the capital. but they expected more. even though anger boils over on the streets, most say they were willing to wait as long as they saw evidence the country was moving in the right direction. >> what are the chances that the new government can fulfill that demand for jobs amongst its young people? >> it is going to take a long time. look at the problems in europe and america. it is all about jobs. that is when it comes down to. these are countries who have lived with decades of authoritarian rule. in tunisia, 75% of its exports go through europe. there is also a physical problem. you need a leadership concentrating on the right issues. there is a criticism here. in tunis, the leaders are too bogged down in political battles. the role of religion in the street -- state. two years of feels like a long time if you are wai
in different parts of karachi, another in a different city as they tried to vaccinate against polio. police say the -- it is clear these were coordinated attacks. the taliban are in charge of this area, says the mother of one of the victims. they say this polio-polio program was planned by america to finish off our nation. they shot my daughter in the head. in the 1990's, about 20,000 people and here in pakistan were affected by polio. that came down to just 28 in 2005. but the numbers have risen since then and there is a risk they could rise further. what changed was propaganda from the pot -- the pakistani taliban. bay said the health workers were spies from western agencies and that they would sterilize children. began the program in some areas and workers were beaten out in others. then the militants found another justification for their position. when american -- america try to use a pakistani doctor and a fixed -- fake a vaccination program to get information about the home of bin laden. >> unfortunately, and in advisedly, they employed a health a vaccination campaign as a cover activity.
a hot drink. many have complained that very often these shelters on and on the outskirts of major cities of sometimes too hard to find. >> you need to take a bus to get there but i don't have any money to pay for my fair. i don't think i would be better off there. >> many homeless ukrainians will have to spend the new year holiday in these temporary shelters. according to weather forecasts, if a bit warmer in the ukraine in january. >> an ambitious mission to drill through 3 kilometers of antarctic ice has been cut short. they aimed to explore a lake that had been hidden for half a million years. the project to find hints of simple life existing in these extreme conditions. however, they failed and the team was forced to abandon the project. >> this is science at his toughest into this video from the british and arctic survey shows that backbreaking effort by 12 scientists and engineers trying to drill through the ice. with bare hands on steel, the mission depended on hot water being blasted down into the ice to open the routes to an ancient lake. from a tiny camp on the ice, it was to e
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)

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